Practicing…

Breathing the polluted air easily, hearing the horn even before the signal changes from red to green, while 5 seconds left. Spitting at your face or body easily from buses. Swimming slowly in the heavy traffic. IT company buses roaming throughout the city which is much more than city buses… Sun starring with such hottttttttness this makes me not to go out at day time. Anytime any kind of disasters can happen. I’m in Chennai 😛 Getting ready for my corporate life. Back to blogging after a long time🙂

13 thoughts on “Practicing…

  1. ha ha ha you will get used to it… But this city will treat you well… More hang out places to go🙂 Enjoy your stay here… All the best for your corporate life😛

  2. And if you get bored, catch Vidhya and ask to show you the “hang out” places😀
    Corporate life? its not a life, you will find out soon.😛

  3. oh…ya have to ask her😛 not a life? may be…. any way have to live in it…..

    Welcome here! Thanks for the comment… Keep visiting..

  4. Heehahahaaa :EVIL:
    well this is a part of ur life..make ur life rocking rather than locking..is nt it gr8 to live at dfrnt places😛
    n is it raining in chennai …stiil hot ?😦

  5. I am a south east asian foreigner who is living in Chennai, and have never lived in Bangalore. So, I cant compare B and C.

    Fortunately,I speak tamil, so language is not an issue for me in Chennai. What I like about Chennai is that people will talk to you if you stop them on the road and ask a question or something. Some cities in the world cannot boast that at all! I also think Chennai has the best fruit juices (value for money – wise) I have had, compared to many of the world’s cities I’ve savoured fresh juice in.

    However, the issues of living in Chennai ARE very different for a local Indian and someone who is coming from a different country, like me. So my perspective may seem far-out to many local readers of this thread. Nonetheless, here is a foreigner’s (mine) perspective:

    1) RESIDENCE: When I came to Chennai to study (alone)I had to find accommodation. It seemed that I had no credibility before I even started, because I was a single female with no family tugging along. I was turned away from nearly 30 potential residences, as a flat lessee. Apparently I posed a threat to the owner/flat/god-knows-what, by being single, female and pledging to pay my rentals on time! The flats that did accept me, posed a huge safety threat, e.g wine shops next door and area having shady characters. I literally had to run out of some of the houses and flats, after viewing them. A couple of housing agents also claimed to be agents but upon some enquiring and questioning, I found out that they were sub-sub-sub-sub-sub agents, who could not even SHOW you the interior of the house cos they obviously have no access to the keys. And all this after waiting two hours outside the flat. Maybe in Chennai this is normal, but to an international visitor, it is the best way, to say “we are inhospitable and undfriendly as a city”.

    HOSTELS: Incidentally, I checked out the hostels too… (12 in total) and they looked like refugee camps, with 6-8 persons squeezed into tiny spaces. It was not surprising then, that 3 of the girls I saw in one place were having diarrea together. I’ve heard of communal living, but this is was too much…

    2) TRANSPORT and INFRASTRUCTURE: Finally I found a place after 5 months, 30 flats/PG and 12 hostels. But like many of the other homes I saw throughout Chennai, roads outside your place has no pavements. So the main road along which I live, is difficult to walk along without feeling like it may be your last walk. I carry my equipment to class and getting on a running bus with that, was not for me. Also, I had to constantly put up with the “brushers” and “pokers”…surprisingly from BOTH genders, on the bus! I had enough after a month, juggling equipment, “brushers” and the bus brakes that kill. Therefore, walking to the bus stop (1 km away) was done with. Autos were resorted to. Then there was the daily nightmare of haggling with the auto drivers, who think that if you wear jeans and look like you’ve had a bath, you have to pay 2x as much as some one who sloppily dresses in an unwashed khameez and hair in tangles! (This is the only city I’ve lived in where you get treated better if you look like crap!).

    Then of course, you have to put up with the auto driving itself. Nothing is wrong with autos if you ask me. The drivers need psychological and behavioural certificates to carry passengers. That is all, if you ask me. Incidentally, in my last year alone, in Chennai, I have had 3 auto-accidents. Compare that with NONE, when I lived in 7 other cities for a cumulative figure of 30 years. One of the accidents has even led me to have a severely debilitated arm. Need I say more?

    So, I’m sorry, but water issues, noise, air pollution etc, are things I have long put up with in various cities. Chennai is not to be faulted on those matters.

    But it is the people that make a city, and if my first impression of Chennai was so good thanks to the good samaritans who responded to my enquiries on the street, I don’t know why these good vibes don’t translate into other daily practices, whether it is renting out your flat or dealing with your auto customer. What happened to “kalaacharam” and” panpaadu” that Chennai can be so proud of? Or is that something reserved for portrayal in award-winning art films about Chennai?

  6. I am a south east asian foreigner who is living in Chennai.

    Fortunately,I speak tamil, so language is not an issue for me in Chennai. What I like about Chennai is that people will talk to you if you stop them on the road and ask a question or something. Some cities in the world cannot boast that at all! I also think Chennai has the best fruit juices (value for money – wise) I have had, compared to many of the world’s cities I’ve savoured fresh juice in.

    However, the issues of living in Chennai ARE very different for a local Indian and someone who is coming from a different country, like me. So my perspective may seem far-out to many local readers of this thread. Nonetheless, here is a foreigner’s (mine) perspective:

    1) RESIDENCE: When I came to Chennai to study my post grad (alone)I had to find accommodation. It seemed that I had no credibility before I even started, because I was a single female with no family tugging along. I was turned away from nearly 30 potential residences, as a flat lessee. Apparently I posed a threat to the owner/flat/god-knows-what, by being single, female and pledging to pay my rentals on time! The flats that did accept me, posed a huge safety threat, e.g wine shops next door and area having shady characters. I literally had to run out of some of the houses and flats, after viewing them. A couple of housing agents also claimed to be agents but upon some enquiring and questioning, I found out that they were sub-sub-sub-sub-sub agents, who could not even SHOW you the interior of the house cos they obviously have no access to the keys. And all this after waiting two hours outside the flat. Maybe in Chennai this is normal, but to an international visitor, it is the best way, to say “we are inhospitable and undfriendly as a city”.

    HOSTELS: Incidentally, I checked out the hostels too… (12 in total) and they looked like refugee camps, with 6-8 persons squeezed into tiny spaces. It was not surprising then, that 3 of the girls I saw in one place were having diarrea together. I’ve heard of communal living, but this is was too much…

    2) TRANSPORT and INFRASTRUCTURE: Finally I found a place after 5 months, 30 flats/PG and 12 hostels. But like many of the other homes I saw throughout Chennai, roads outside your place has no pavements. So the main road along which I live, is difficult to walk along without feeling like it may be your last walk. I carry my equipment to class and getting on a running bus with that, was not for me. Also, I had to constantly put up with the “brushers” and “pokers”…surprisingly from BOTH genders, on the bus! I had enough after a month, juggling equipment, “brushers” and the bus brakes that kill. Therefore, walking to the bus stop (1 km away) was done with. Autos were resorted to. Then there was the daily nightmare of haggling with the auto drivers, who think that if you wear jeans and look like you’ve had a bath, you have to pay 2x as much as some one who sloppily dresses in an unwashed khameez and hair in tangles! (This is the only city I’ve lived in where you get treated better if you look like crap!). Then of course, you have to put up with the auto driving itself. Nothing is wrong with autos if you ask me. The drivers need psychological and behavioural certificates to carry passengers. That is all, if you ask me. Incidentally, in my last year alone, in Chennai, I have had 3 auto-accidents. Compare that with NONE, when I lived in 7 other cities for a cumulative figure of 30 years. One of the accidents has even led me to have a severely debilitated arm. Need I say more?

    So, I’m sorry, but water issues, noise, air pollution etc, are things I have long put up with in various cities. Chennai is not to be faulted on those matters.

    But it is the people that make a city, and if my first impression of Chennai was so good thanks to the good samaritans who responded to my enquiries on the street, I don’t know why these good vibes don’t translate into other daily practices, whether it is renting out your flat or dealing with your auto customer. What happened to “kalaacharam” and” panpaadu” that Chennai can be so proud of? Or is that something reserved for portrayal in award-winning art films about Chennai?

  7. @Dana_gael

    Mmm… such a great narration of chennai life. Whatever you described was absolutely true. Even you could have made your comment as a post in blog🙂 Thanks a lot for such a great comment.

    BTW Welcome to Awesome Life. Keep visiting🙂

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